Don’t touch my threads!

“Artist-in-Residence HOTTEA transformed Viacom’s worldwide headquarters with his largest installation to date.” Artist uptown residence Dave takes Pictures was brought in to make pretty pictures of said person going by HOTTEA for Viacom. Nobody told me I shouldn’t touch the thread! Okay, I should have known… but it was just yarn hanging from a ceiling with a few kinks and tangles here and there!

One of our lights touched yarn, HOTTEA was present, he was distressed, before anyone could get a ladder we used a light stand to unstick a few stands that had stuck together. Good thing we weren’t in the elevator lobby where the HVAC had tangled up a few yards of yarn. Sure does look pretty though!

Thanks Mike for giving me a hand with the gear and running through the shots. Thanks Julie for not wanting to do it and tossing me the work… and also walking through a shot.

 

 

Hot Tea installation at Viacom NYC

Best of the Best!

One Eyeland submission by David Neff published in 2017 Best of the Best Photographers book

Another day, another promo… My photo of Joe Davis, scientist, researcher and Artist was accepted to One Eyeland for publication in “Best of the Best” 2017. Nice print job! Thanks again Joe for being an interesting subject beyond expectations.

It’s always sweet when one of my favorite images resurfaces. In this case, my wife Alice prodded me to get in touch with an old acquaintance on my next trip to Boston knowing fully well how I’d love Joe Davis’s art and attitude. She hadn’t been in his studio space though if she/I had any idea what I was about to encounter, the whole day might have been blocked out to poke around and play with gadgets. Joe’s a classic hands on tinkerer, researcher, artist. Renaissance man in flannels with a baseball bat for a lower leg. Thanks for an entertaining afternoon Joe. I’d love to have a few hours more to look at your work, if I was only 21 and fresh out of college I might beg for an internship though I get the feeing I’d be waitlisted.

See a clear image of Joe Davis here.

and more Joe here too!

 

Stuffing your squirrel*, no cranberry please?

An interview with Wilder Duncan, classical artist, taxidermist and Brooklynite

A happy coincidence, having missed a special seminar at the Secret Science club a few years back: a client from Chicago asked me to introduce his nephew to the Great Fredini thinking there could be some symbiosis.  Before passing on the info, I thought it best to check out his credentials.  To my delight, Wilder happened to be a rather colorful person well deserving of documentation.

Wilder Duncan photographed in his parlor Brooklyn NY 2013 (David Neff)

Wilder honed his craft at Wesleyan University.  A mashup of classical art education, the lifelong love for animals, art, history and diorama.  His reanimation of roadkill began in Newton, Massachusetts.  Self-taught as a taxidermist he went on to be the make it look alive again guy at the Evolution Store.  When he’s not making or protecting art, he teaches workshops in preparation of zoological displays.

When he was 12, Wilder’s aunt found a dead Oriole, that would be the first bird he stuffed.  When I asked him what got him started, he said, ” People love animals so much they decide to stretch their skins over something else so they can look at them forever; this phenomenon fascinates me.”  He had already professed his love of animals ten minutes earlier.  What would he hope to do with his work one day?  Show it as a whacked out, crazy natural history collection.  Hellooo Museum of Natural History, anyone want a resume’? Sideshow!  Take me with you!  You can pay me (David)  peanuts to brush the beetles out of the dioramas.

Coincidentally, a few days later I ran into The Great Fredini as I was passing through Union Square.  Introduction done.  Museum of Natural History, meet Coney Island, I see great hairy reanimated possibilities.  Did someone say sideshow?

See more of Wilder’s work here

* note: Wilder would like it to be known that all animals used by him are acquired legally as well as ethically.  Please practice responsible taxidermy.  Live animals are to be respected, expired animals are to be admired.

 

Wilder Duncan photographed in his parlor Brooklyn NY 2013 (David Neff)

Wilder Duncan photographed in his parlor Brooklyn NY 2013 (David Neff)

 

Container Art

Figment Festival Governor’s Island New york review

Figment Container
Figment Festival Governor’s Island NY 2010
Amazing festival to attend if you have the time.  I am pretty sure this is the third year they have done it the festival.  It began as a low budget gallery walk through where artists set up temporary galleries in the abandoned housing left over from the island’s former use as a military base.  The energy level in general was very positive, an amazing number of family oriented open air exhibits and interactive events are all over the many lawns, under beautiful trees and in the houses once again.  Pictured above, something I absolutely loved, shipping containers converted to use as picnic pavilions overlooking the Hudson Harbor at the south end of the island.  Make time for this one, read more about it and get involved.  Even the free ferry ride from Manhattan to the island is worth something… all free! and plenty to see and do.

D’Nono happened! (No drinks for you!!)

the bar of denial with John Bonafede at the helm

 

Here is an image of our installation with John Bonafede manning the Table of Denial.

We had great turnout last night at X Initiative Gallery for the closing exhibition.  More than two hundred people were denied service!  One bottle of champagne almost filched, many smoked almonds picked with some returned upon request.  We have much work to do sorting out who is whom in our image captures and editing the body down to something presentable.  Considering the 3am wrap-up for the crew, and a few days of shooting ahead, expect images next week.